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What’s Blooming? Back Yard Flower Tour April 23

More pics from yesterday’s tour of our back yard veggie garden … here’s a bit of what’s currently blooming in our back yard:

Pastel Pink English Daisies in the new raised flower bed.

Pastel Pink English Daisies in the new raised flower bed.

Delphinium, blown over by the afternoon wind.

Perrenial Delphinium, blown over by the afternoon wind.

Purple pansies and pink dianthus in the raised flowerbed behind the deck.

Purple pansies and pink dianthus in the raised flowerbed behind the deck.

Baby praying mantis, appox. 1/2" long, on a ready-to-bloom sunflower.  We are blessed with a large number of praying mantises every year.

Baby praying mantis — approximately 1/2″ long — on a ready-to-bloom sunflower. We are blessed with a large number of praying mantises every year.

Buttery yellow poppy and fuschia-colored dianthus, in Bed 8 in the back garden.  They'll soon be joined by 4 tomato plants.

Buttery yellow poppy and fuschia-colored dianthus, both of which have a long blooming season and freely reseed themselves. These are in Bed 8 in the back garden, where we can see them from our bedroom windows. They’ll soon be joined by tomato plants and basil.

Ready to pick flamingo chard, with mini Marguerites.

Mini Marguerites edge the ends of my raised veggie beds from fall through spring. Here, they’re growing next to leafy green basil and ready-to-pick flamingo chard.

Lobelia and dianthus, ready to transplant to the front yard herb garden that's under construction.

Lobelia and dianthus, ready to transplant.

Though some people think it’s strange — or a waste of valuable food growing space — I’m a cottage gardener at heart, and I love the look of flowers mixed in with my vegetables and herbs. They’re terrific companion plants, attracting pollinators while helping repel unwanted pests, and some — like the sunflowers — are also helpful decoys, attracting insects that would be otherwise be munching on my tomatoes, eggplants, and salad greens. Flowers add color to the garden, help conserve water by shading the soil, provide a home for beneficial insects, and encourage birds to visit the garden, which helps control unwanted insects while providing natural fertilizer. It’s definitely a win/win situation for everyone: people, plants, and wildlife.

What do you think? Do you plant flowers with your veggies and herbs? What are your favorite flowers to grow, either in or out of the vegetable garden?

sunflower13

{ 1 comment… add one }
  • Jane July 23, 2014, 3:29 pm

    Congrats on your beautiful new blog! Love it! Your photos are beautiful! Will be checking out the rest of your posts now – looking forward to reading all about your garden, your trips and recipes!

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